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Thread: How do i wire 2 RJ45 Cables into one module?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by k3vst3r View Post
    Single cable from module 2 to switch, then switch has 2 cables coming from it for each device.
    Theoretically I'm already doing this. Must be wired differently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
    You can do this if you are going in to the back of wall Ethernet wall sockets at either end AND you wire the cables correctly.. However, it will only run at 100mb rather then GB. 100mb only uses 2 of the 4 pairs, whereas GB uses all 4. So it's just a case of making sure the right pairs are terminated in the right bits of the wall socket. That's the only way - other than that, you'll need a switch, as has been said.

    That's exactly how there wired in... into back of sockets. Sorry should of mentioned.
    Would you know where I could get the right diagram to wire correctly?
    I'm assuming it would be 2 pairs from each cable, which colour cables I wouldn't know [emoji19]

    Cheers 🖒

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelkenward View Post
    It's getting a power source to it though. I don't like seeing cables lol

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    Just noticed the second page lol Tapatalk for you 😂
    Thanks for all suggestions, I feel like not using the cable to the second room as it's causing confusion here and I really don't want to be putting "another" device in that requires power.

    What about using the one cable as normal so I'm getting the right speed and then using a power line (the one that flows through power cables) to give the other room Internet?

    What's your thought on that?

    Cheers

    Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by cold fusion View Post
    Definitely not that one though.
    Yes. I was surprised by Aria's limited range. I just linked to the cheapest. I always use Netgear but didn't want to link out to the competition.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mache View Post
    Theoretically I'm already doing this.
    Not really. A switch is more than a bunch of crossed wires.
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  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mache View Post
    Theoretically I'm already doing this. Must be wired differently.

    Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk
    Nope. In a switch each end of the ethernet cable is terminated. The switch then intelligently pushes only the relevant ethernet packets down the relevant ports depending on what devices are terminated at the other end (switches literally inspect your traffic and pushes it down specific wires knowing what IPs are at the end of that wire).

    In the old days of coax networks you would have been able to do the kind of bodgery you're describing. In fact there was perfectly legitimate network topologies based around doing that. But this was years ago when 10 base T was considered fast. In fact I studied coax topologies at college and then never needed to use that knowledge again.

    But to go back to your point, ethernet cables are meant to be terminated. You can get away with an inline coupler because it's effectively just an extension cable but I really wouldn't recommend any more elaborate splicing like the kind of couplers you've been posting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelkenward View Post
    Yes. I was surprised by Aria's limited range. I just linked to the cheapest. I always use Netgear but didn't want to link out to the competition.



    Not really. A switch is more than a bunch of crossed wires.
    I was thinking 1 in 2 out which in principle is the same but yes your right, a switch is a bit more than wires 😊

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    Quote Originally Posted by cold fusion View Post
    Nope. In a switch each end of the ethernet cable is terminated. The switch then intelligently pushes only the relevant ethernet packets down the relevant ports depending on what devices are terminated at the other end (switches literally inspect your traffic and pushes it down specific wires knowing what IPs are at the end of that wire).

    In the old days of coax networks you would have been able to do the kind of bodgery you're describing. In fact there was perfectly legitimate network topologies based around doing that. But this was years ago when 10 base T was considered fast. In fact I studied coax topologies at college and then never needed to use that knowledge again. [emoji38]

    But to go back to your point, ethernet cables are meant to be terminated. You can get away with an inline coupler because it's effectively just an extension cable but I really wouldn't recommend any more elaborate splicing like the kind of couplers you've been posting.
    I wouldn't call it bodgery but ok. This is all new to me and I'm in a completely different trade obviously. 😊

    I've wired in just the one cable now and I'm up and running. What I decide to do for the other room I'm undecided yet.

    Any suggestions would be awesome!

    Cheers

    Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by cold fusion View Post
    Are you even going to get 100Mb out of that kludge though?
    Doubtful. But that's not what I was referring to. I was talking about just general speeds.

    Quote Originally Posted by cold fusion View Post
    Wouldn't be at all surprised if you end up running a lot slower due to packet loss due to the proximity of the twisted pairs and the ratio of the twists (IIRC the pairs are twisted at different "intensities" - for want a better description).
    On the flip side to my last comment though, I had a contract with a school when I ran my own IT business. The entire place was wired like that (cost saving in previous years I suspect..) and they actually got pretty good speeds and minimal packet loss. I still wouldn't CHOOSE to do it like that if I had the option though. It all depends on the individual scenario, type of cable/any shielding etc etc... Bottom line is though, it does work and can get you out of a hole as a last resort. And still probably better than wireless..

    Quote Originally Posted by cold fusion View Post
    Honestly though, if one is going to the trouble to wire a house then I really don't see the point in going 100Mb as it will only need to be ripped out and redone again in a few months / years.
    Again, totally agree. But I initially got that impression that in this case, the cabling is potentially already in place and he's just trying to give himself an extra socket without having to run new cabling.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Mache View Post
    I wouldn't call it bodgery but ok. This is all new to me and I'm in a completely different trade obviously. ��

    I've wired in just the one cable now and I'm up and running. What I decide to do for the other room I'm undecided yet.

    Any suggestions would be awesome!

    Cheers

    Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk
    Sorry but it literally is bodgery. This isn't me being elitist or trying to over spec your solution. What you were suggesting is very much against the specs of ethernet and thus very much a non-standard bodge. Ethernet needs to be terminated at each end which is what switches do. I think many people don't realise just how much processing happens on a switch. For example it's it's not the same in principle as your Y splitter. Not even close. A comparison might be to think of a light beam being transmitted from your friends torch. Your splitter would be a folded mirror that sends the same beam of light into two different directions. A switch is a person observing the light beam and then flashing their torch in only one of the two directions but knowing which of those two directions it needs to be flashed.

    Switches are mini computers that read your ethernet traffic and then resend them down the correct cable. That's why they need to be powered. (switches actually do a lot more processing than that but that's moving onto some pretty advanced network theory)

    I should add that you shouldn't feel discouraged or overwhelmed by the comments you're receiving. Lots of people who work in IT haven't a clue about how ethernet works. So you're already doing better than them despite working in a different trade

  12. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron View Post
    Doubtful. But that's not what I was referring to. I was talking about just general speeds.

    On the flip side to my last comment though, I had a contract with a school when I ran my own IT business. The entire place was wired like that (cost saving in previous years I suspect..) and they actually got pretty good speeds and minimal packet loss. I still wouldn't CHOOSE to do it like that if I had the option though. It all depends on the individual scenario, type of cable/any shielding etc etc... Bottom line is though, it does work and can get you out of a hole as a last resort. And still probably better than wireless..

    Again, totally agree. But I initially got that impression that in this case, the cabling is potentially already in place and he's just trying to give himself an extra socket without having to run new cabling.
    Yeah, wireless it pretty awful most of the time. Half the time I don't even have it enabled on my phone. For static items I'd take powerline adapters over wireless any day of the week.

  13. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by cold fusion View Post
    Sorry but it literally is bodgery. This isn't me being elitist or trying to over spec your solution. What you were suggesting is very much against the specs of ethernet and thus very much a non-standard bodge. Ethernet needs to be terminated at each end which is what switches do. I think many people don't realise just how much processing happens on a switch. For example it's it's not the same in principle as your Y splitter. Not even close. A comparison might be to think of a light beam being transmitted from your friends torch. Your splitter would be a folded mirror that sends the same beam of light into two different directions. A switch is a person observing the light beam and then flashing their torch in only one of the two directions but knowing which of those two directions it needs to be flashed.

    Switches are mini computers that read your ethernet traffic and then resend them down the correct cable. That's why they need to be powered. (switches actually do a lot more processing than that but that's moving onto some pretty advanced network theory)

    I should add that you shouldn't feel discouraged or overwhelmed by the comments you're receiving. Lots of people who work in IT haven't a clue about how ethernet works. So you're already doing better than them despite working in a different trade
    Cheers bud, I'm learning lol

    Appreciate all the help!

    I think there's another way of using one modular for each rj45 socket I will just have to move the router out from the centre of the house. Reason for this was I would get a so called efficient wireless being centre but as I've also learned that's also not the case 😂

    Cheers

    Sent from my SM-G901F using Tapatalk

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