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Another Linux dual boot issue, debian on laptop

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  • Another Linux dual boot issue, debian on laptop

    Trying to dual boot debian and Windows 10 where windows is my current OS but have issues.

    I am at the partition screen with my hard drive partitioned as in the pic but don't get any opinions or see how to install debian alongside windows.

    Guided with the continuous free space says the free space is too small and resizing doesn't work as it says it's impossible to resize.

    I'd like to keep my current windows install other wise I'd have started from scratch and re-installed it before starting the Linux install plus I do want to try debian.

    Any help appreciated as I've no clue what I'm doing tbh.

    Sent from my C6603 using Tapatalk
    "They're gonna find out
    I don't know who they are or what they're gonna find out
    But they're gonna find out
    And it's gonna be over real quick"

  • #2
    Looks like Windows has taken over the whole disk. Is that 10.8GB partition (#6) being used for anything? That would be enough for Debian (more would have been better but beggers can't be choosers)

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    • #3
      That 10gb should be the recovery partition which i'd like to keep.
      I might just have to do a re-install of Windows on part of the HDD then install Debian onto whatever space I keep left over for it.

      I don't mind doing the above but was really hoping i wouldn't have to spend time on a Windows install and then setup when it's as I like..
      "They're gonna find out
      I don't know who they are or what they're gonna find out
      But they're gonna find out
      And it's gonna be over real quick"

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      • #4
        Ok so I installed windows, left a 90gb partition for debian which I installed to though had to switch to CSM in bios as it wouldn't boot to the USB drive linux was on with the laptop set to UEFI.
        On a similar note, during the install I got a message about debian being the only OS which was fine as I thought I could add windows later.
        Debian installed and booted just fine first try, but having switched back to UEFI the laptop now boots into windows 10.

        I am unfamiliar with UEFI as my laptop (1 year old) is the first time I've had to deal with it so I'm probably missing something.
        "They're gonna find out
        I don't know who they are or what they're gonna find out
        But they're gonna find out
        And it's gonna be over real quick"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by darklighthim View Post
          Ok so I installed windows, left a 90gb partition for debian which I installed to though had to switch to CSM in bios as it wouldn't boot to the USB drive linux was on with the laptop set to UEFI.
          On a similar note, during the install I got a message about debian being the only OS which was fine as I thought I could add windows later.
          Debian installed and booted just fine first try, but having switched back to UEFI the laptop now boots into windows 10.

          I am unfamiliar with UEFI as my laptop (1 year old) is the first time I've had to deal with it so I'm probably missing something.
          UEFI and BIOS are two different and incompatible ways of starting an OS. If Windows is already installed using UEFI then it's probably best to stick with UEFI, You can get Debian to install on UEFI (https://wiki.debian.org/UEFI has more details) but it's not something I've done myself. To tell you the truth, I've usually opted for BIOS as it's just easier to set up in Linux.

          Unless you have any specific reason for running Debian over any other flavour of Linux, my recommendation would be to give Ubuntu a try instead. It's basically a dumbed down version of Debian, so should be easier to install on UEFI partitions.

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          • #6
            Cheers for the reply.

            I have setup windows for now on my HDD via UEFI for now so I can use it and figure out what I'm doing.
            No real need for Debian over any other Linux flavour, was just one I knew of so decided to give it a try.

            I do mostly web browsing, some office (Word mainly) stuff and a bit of media consumption so really just looking to see how I get on with Linux in the long term but still have windows to fall back on if needed.
            May end up switching the laptop to Linux if I like it, it's a pretty basic model anyway (Dual core celeron, 4gb DDR3 ram and Intel HD graphics) so as above I won't do much which most forms of linux should handle easily i'm guessing.
            "They're gonna find out
            I don't know who they are or what they're gonna find out
            But they're gonna find out
            And it's gonna be over real quick"

            Comment


            • #7
              Bar a few niche versions of Linux, they're all pretty much the same. They can all do the same things, it's just some require doing it slightly differently.

              Given you just want something easy that "just works", go with Ubuntu. It's not one I use myself but it's pretty easy and sounds a good fit for you.

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