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Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10

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  • Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10

    According to sources at Canonical, Ubuntu Linux's parent company, and Microsoft, you'll soon be able to run Ubuntu on Windows 10.

    This will be more than just running the Bash shell on Windows 10. After all, thanks to programs such as Cygwin or MSYS utilities, hardcore Unix users have long been able to run the popular Bash command line interface (CLI) on Windows.

    With this new addition, Ubuntu users will be able to run Ubuntu simultaneously with Windows. This will not be in a virtual machine, but as an integrated part of Windows 10.

    The details won't be revealed until tomorrow's morning keynote speech at Microsoft Build. It is believed that Ubuntu will run on top of Windows 10's recently and quietly introduced Linux subsystems in a new Windows 10 Redstone build.

    Microsoft and Canonical will not, however, sources say, be integrating Linux per se into Windows. Instead, Ubuntu will primarily run on a foundation of native Windows libraries. This would indicate that while Microsoft is still hard at work on bringing containers to Windows 10 in project Barcelona, this isn't the path Ubuntu has taken to Windows.

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/microso...tag=RSSbaffb68
    This is interesting. I do run a Windows 7 VM for compatibility reasons. I do have cygwin loaded for convenience, but frankly cygwin is poo. However I might actually be tempted to upgrade to Win 10 if this proves even half as good as it sounds.

  • #2
    So is this effectively saying that Win10 will natively work with Linux Commands and Programs?

    Or something else?



    Originally posted by coiler
    Stomach was rumbling like a fatman landing on Sanctuary

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    • #3
      embrace, extend, extinguish

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      • #4
        I've got a microsoft hating mate who's just going to love this news
        Why did the chicken cross the road?
        To get away from the Canadian poultry farmer with loose trousers.

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        • #5
          This will be great if it works the way I think it will.
          PC1: Q6600 - 4GB DDR2-800 - ATI HD4850 1GB
          PC2: X2 3800 - 1GB DDR-400 - ATI 9250 256mb
          HTPC: E6600 - 2GB DDR2-533 - ATI HD5450 512mb

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Aaron View Post
            So is this effectively saying that Win10 will natively work with Linux Commands and Programs?

            Or something else?

            It's not very clear in the article. As the article discussed there's been a few solutions before; some office MS POSIX layers too. But they've all been largely rubbish - just good enough to get the job done but bad enough that you hate yourself for using it. However this might be a fully MS endorsed "cygwin" alternative. Either way, I'm quite looking forward to the proper unveiling tomorrow.

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            • #7
              grapevine has been rife with rumours about a flavour coming from redmond for months as they had hired linux staff. then it came out microsoft use linux inhouse, now this makes sense i guess.
              "Those able to see beyond the shadows and lies of their culture will never be understood, let alone believed, by the masses."
              Plato

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              • #8
                Originally posted by luke22 View Post
                grapevine has been rife with rumours about a flavour coming from redmond for months as they had hired linux staff. then it came out microsoft use linux inhouse, now this makes sense i guess.
                What you're referring to is more likely the Debian-based networking switches Microsoft announced earlier in the year. A very different beast from running a Linux layer atop of desktop Windows.

                Networking gear is almost exclusively Linux and BSD (I exaggerate a little, there are some QNX solutions as well as bespoke stuff like Cisco IOS) and it's not uncommon for larger organisations (like Facebook and Google sort of scale) to build their own networking gear, so they'd obviously go with an established kernel + minimal userland with lots of optimisations in the TCP/IP stack. Linux and BSD are excellently placed for this. So it would make sense for Microsoft to run Linux on their switches.
                Last edited by cold fusion; 30-03-16, 15:36.

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                • #9
                  now does this mean they're acquired the best parts to supplement what they already do well?
                  "Those able to see beyond the shadows and lies of their culture will never be understood, let alone believed, by the masses."
                  Plato

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by luke22 View Post
                    now does this mean they're acquired the best parts to supplement what they already do well?
                    I'm probably the wrong person to answer that as I'm of the opinion that they don't do much well (aside extorting money from businesses).

                    More detail on this Ubuntu + Windows project:

                    http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2016/...n-windows.html

                    to;dr version: it's like the same technology / principles as WINE on Linux; but for natively running Linux applications on Windows. Looks pretty exciting actually. Though still a few caveats: still stuck with cmd.exe's terminal emulator, which is just horrible (seriously Microsoft, depreciate it already; adding copy/paste shortcuts is really just too little too late) and vt100 support isn't quite there yet so tmux, screen, ncurses, etc may be a bit glitchy. But on the whole it actually looks really promising; I'm definitely going to give this a spin once it's released.

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                    • #11
                      I didn't see this coming either:

                      Microsoft Visual C++ for Linux Development

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                      • #12
                        Yeah, however the VS for linux is absolutely nothing like the version for windows. More of a glorified text editor rather than a full IDE. Not that that's necessarily a bad thing, hell I still use VI for most stuff.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by andyn View Post
                          Yeah, however the VS for linux is absolutely nothing like the version for windows. More of a glorified text editor rather than a full IDE. Not that that's necessarily a bad thing, hell I still use VI for most stuff.
                          You've got our wires crossed dude

                          You're talking about Visual Studio Code and you're right that it's "just" a text editor but it's also not "VS for Linux". Visual Studio Code is a separate cross-platform editor (basically a fork of Github's "Atom") designed to compete with Sublime Text, Notepad++, etc. So VS Code is available for Windows too. But it's a stupidly confusing name given the number of people who have mistaken it for the VS IDE.

                          Anyhow, the article is literally about the Visual Studio IDE (the proper thing), but it's not been ported to Linux. What Microsoft have done is added official support for cross-compiling and C++ development of Linux binaries. So still using Windows as your dev platform but for writing Linux software. Between this announcement and the Ubuntu userland on Win10 (what started this thread): I think Microsoft are trying to cash in on how trendy OS X is for open source development.


                          I do agree with you that I can't ever see Microsoft porting VS to Linux though. But then I said the same about MS SQL Server running on Linux so who knows what will happen in the future.

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                          • #14
                            Ah I see. The article itself is slightly confusingly worded: 'C++ development in Visual Studio for Linux' would have been better written as 'C++ development for Linux in Visual Studio'. Though when you read more it becomes clear what they are talking about.


                            As well as the MacOS angle, I think they also have half an eye on raspberry pi development. It's not big numerically but being aimed at an educational market it punches above it's weight in terms of 'the developers of the future'. The article itself goes into some examples with Pi and the 'Internet of Things'.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by andyn View Post
                              Ah I see. The article itself is slightly confusingly worded: 'C++ development in Visual Studio for Linux' would have been better written as 'C++ development for Linux in Visual Studio'. Though when you read more it becomes clear what they are talking about.
                              Yeah, very true.

                              Originally posted by andyn View Post
                              As well as the MacOS angle, I think they also have half an eye on raspberry pi development. It's not big numerically but being aimed at an educational market it punches above it's weight in terms of 'the developers of the future'. The article itself goes into some examples with Pi and the 'Internet of Things'.
                              I'd not thought about that. Yeah, that's a really good point.

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