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  • Linux Local Language

    ------------------------
    Last edited by Ice Tea; 09-11-16, 09:44.

  • #2
    You wouldn't notice any difference except in text files containing certain peculiar characters. I believe (from memory, might be wrong) that en_GB is ISO-8559 encoded, whereas the other is obviously using the UTF-8 encoding scheme. UTF 8 is more 'modern' in that it's a multibyte character encoding scheme supporting more locales, whereas ISO-8559 is pretty much ASCII, and is a single-byte encoding scheme supporting fewer locales.

    To answer your question, though, I just use whatever is the default, which I think is probably UTF-8 nowadays.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Ice Tea View Post
      en_GB

      or

      en_GB.UTF-8


      What do you guys use as i've never noticed any difference...........
      That's just the terminal local so you'll probably never need it. But to answer your question: since there's quite a few terminal utilities that make use of unicode characters for things like rudimentary bar charts, I'd always recommend UTF-8 over the older Western European character encodings (ISO-8559, as Andyn pointed out).

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      • #4
        /me wonders if he is on Ice Tea's Ignore List.

        (would also explain the reposting of linked articles too)

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        • #5
          Yes, that's what everyone had already told you.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ice Tea
            * incase anyone can't see the above PNG i posted as it seems some have a problem with that format *

            So in answer to the question if anyone else has ever been interested , British users will never need UTF-8 and it will cause a slight speed penalty when running applications.

            So if the default is UTF-8 change it to en_GB
            I guess anyone who views my user text (♩♪♫♫♩♬♪♪♫♬♩♬) can't be British either then.

            Plus the speed penalty is going to be so insignificant that 99.99999% of users wouldn't notice the difference.

            So the for love of sanity, just leave the damn box ticked. UTF-8 is enabled by default for a reason. (I know you're not going to read this Ice Tea since you've added me to your ignore list (lol), I just want to make sure that no other unsuspecting victim falls foul to your dumb advice)
            Last edited by cold fusion; 03-07-14, 00:30.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Siddhua
              >>cold fusion wrote<<
              >> I guess anyone who views my user text (♩♪♫♫♩♬♪♪♫♬♩♬) can't be British either then.
              >>
              >>Plus the speed penalty is going to be so insignificant that 99.99999% of users wouldn't notice the difference.
              >>
              >>So the for love of sanity, just leave the damn box ticked. UTF-8 is enabled by default for a reason. (I know you're not going to read this Ice Tea since you've added me to your >>ignore list (lol), I just want to make sure that no other unsuspecting victim falls foul to your dumb advice)

              linux distributors are the ones that have been advising english users not to bother with UTF8 even though it gets selected as default as can be seen in the example in this thread

              no need to call someone dumb just for passing on their advise
              Ice Tea was not passing on their recommendation. In fact the PNG he posted clear says (in bold, in bottom) that leaving UTF-8 is recommended. And the fact that it's enabled by default should also be a huge indicator of what best to leave it as (you know those distro maintainers you spoke of that made recommendations? Well they're the ones that would have built the ISOs with the default character encodings. So it seems odd for them to recommend one thing; then go build the installer / ISO with the opposite default settings).

              There is no good reason not run run UTF-8 as your default local. In fact there's more good reasons not disable UTF-8 since a whole tone of software uses unicode glyphs (as I'd already demonstrated earlier: ♩♪♫♫♩♬♪♪♫♬♩♬). And if your low end Android handset can cope with UTF-8 encodings, then there is literally no argument in favour of performance improvements on your average 64bit system.

              Lastly, I didn't call Ice Tea dumb; I said his advice was dumb (which it was; even his own evidence (the PNG) cited not to bother disabling UTF-8)
              Last edited by cold fusion; 03-07-14, 09:26.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Siddhua
                reread it a few times until you can tell the difference between the advice given for english , non english & latin derivative languages

                the last part has nothing to do with the last sentence of note 1
                Even so, I've demonstrated a few times now that unicode is used for more than just foreign characters (most of my CLI Linux administration tools I've developed in the last year make use of unicode characters (eg ✔✘) and all of my websites serve unicode characters (eg the CMS I'd written uses unicode smilies instead of using gifs). Some currency icons (eg Bitcoin) are only available in unicode as well.

                Hence why I keep saying that unicode provides more than just eastern characters; there's a lot of glyphs in it which are in common use. Thus in this day and age, disabling UTF-8 makes no sense what-so-ever. Regardless of your written language.
                Last edited by cold fusion; 03-07-14, 11:27.

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                • #9
                  I use the following settings in Arch:

                  locale.conf
                  Code:
                  LANG="en_GB.UTF-8"
                  locale.gen
                  Code:
                  en_GB.UTF-8 UTF-8
                  I've come across a lot of things on the command line that require UTF-8. Various GUI programs will also fail to run/crash if a UTF-8 locale is not present.
                  There is absolutely no reason not to use it.

                  From the Archlinux Wiki:
                  Code:
                  Using UTF-8 is highly recommended over ISO-8859
                  From Cambridge University computer lab:
                  Before UTF-8 emerged, Linux users all over the world had to use various different language-specific extensions of ASCII. This made the exchange of files difficult and application software had to worry about various small differences between these encodings. Support for these encodings was usually incomplete, untested, and unsatisfactory, because the application developers rarely used all these encodings themselves.


                  Because of these difficulties, major Linux distributors and application developers are now phasing out these older legacy encodings in favour of UTF-8.
                  http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/unicode.html#linux - first written in 1999.

                  In Linux UTF-8 has been considered the default since the late '90s. Why on earth anyone would deliberately use anything older and less compatible is beyond me.
                  In fact I haven't seen an argument over UTF-8 vs ISO-8859 since 2005 ish.
                  Last edited by Lorem-Ipsum; 03-07-14, 21:33.
                  Desktop: Intel i5-4690K | 16GB DDR3 | Gigabyte Z97N-WIFI | EVGA GTX 660 3GB | Windows 10
                  Server 0: Gen8 HP Microserver | Proxmox Hypervisor Server 1: Gen8 HP Microserver | FreeNAS

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ice Tea
                    Maybe a Mod would be so kind as to trim this thread back to post 1 , 2 and 14 so not to confuse people.

                    Thanks........
                    Lol just because you don't want to be seen to follow the same advice as what I was giving?

                    I swear some days this place feels like I'm back in preschool.

                    Edit: @ice tea, I dont ask to be liked, but what's the chances we can at least learn to communicate like adults? At least just in threads like these if not the random chit chat threads?
                    Last edited by cold fusion; 04-07-14, 08:40.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cold fusion View Post
                      Lol just because you don't want to be seen to follow the same advice as what I was giving?

                      I swear some days this place feels like I'm back in preschool.

                      Edit: @ice tea, I dont ask to be liked, but what's the chances we can at least learn to communicate like adults? At least just in threads like these if not the random chit chat threads?
                      Just gonna throw this out there...

                      You know he's blocked you, right?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by heavywater View Post
                        Just gonna throw this out there...

                        You know he's blocked you, right?
                        Yeah, but he also logs in under other aliases, so he's seen my posts. If he hadn't, he wouldn't be asking for my posts to be deleted after siding with Lorem-Ipsum.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cold fusion View Post
                          Yeah, but he also logs in under other aliases, so he's seen my posts. If he hadn't, he wouldn't be asking for my posts to be deleted after siding with Lorem-Ipsum.

                          Desktop: Intel i5-4690K | 16GB DDR3 | Gigabyte Z97N-WIFI | EVGA GTX 660 3GB | Windows 10
                          Server 0: Gen8 HP Microserver | Proxmox Hypervisor Server 1: Gen8 HP Microserver | FreeNAS

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