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Who’s Writing Linux?

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  • Who’s Writing Linux?

    About once a year, the Linux Foundation analyzes the online repository that holds the source code of the kernel, or core, of the Linux operating system. As well as tracking the increasing complexity of the ever-evolving kernel over a series of releases from versions 3.0 to 3.10, the report also reveals who is contributing code, and the dominant role corporations now play in what began as an all-volunteer project in 1991.

    moar graphs: http://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/s...-writing-linux
    Last edited by cold fusion; 03-02-14, 11:21.

  • #2
    oops, I've copied and pasted the wrong article. fixed

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    • #3
      Surprised to see TI so high up there, but I suppose I shouldn't be given the huge number of 'embedded' devices they produce.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by andyn View Post
        Surprised to see TI so high up there, but I suppose I shouldn't be given the huge number of 'embedded' devices they produce.
        I had a similar reaction myself. Because I spend most of my time on Linux servers, I sometimes forget just how massive the embedded (et al) markets are.

        I was also quite surprised to see volunteers still being the highest percentage. I didn't think there were that many (comparatively speaking) freelancers working on the kernel these days.

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        • #5
          You'll probably find even the volunteers are getting paid by someone at some point.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by oneman View Post
            You'll probably find even the volunteers are getting paid by someone at some point.
            I did wonder if that was the case but wasn't really sure if that was just me trying to over complicate things.

            I dint suppose you have any evidence (even just anecdotal) which you could elaborate on?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cold fusion View Post
              I did wonder if that was the case but wasn't really sure if that was just me trying to over complicate things.

              I dint suppose you have any evidence (even just anecdotal) which you could elaborate on?
              I've read a few interviews with developers. Difficult to say if they are already listed as say intel or TI or however as they are effectively contractors rather then direct employees. Unless you have another source of income and a serious amount of time on your hands its going to be difficult to be a developer without payment somewhere.

              Where I can see a lot of voluntary effort is the support side of things with items like websites and forums were people are not getting paid. Probably say the same thing about windows though.

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              • #8
                I would guess that a lot of the 'volunteers' will probably be programmers working in companies which don't have a 'formal' policy/relationship with the linux team but allow their programmer to contribute. Probably a large number are also professional programmers who contribute their spare time outside of work though, too.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by oneman View Post
                  I've read a few interviews with developers. Difficult to say if they are already listed as say intel or TI or however as they are effectively contractors rather then direct employees. Unless you have another source of income and a serious amount of time on your hands its going to be difficult to be a developer without payment somewhere.

                  Where I can see a lot of voluntary effort is the support side of things with items like websites and forums were people are not getting paid. Probably say the same thing about windows though.
                  A lot of those code submissions will be bug fixes more than new features, and I could see the average developer having time to write bug fixes.

                  Personally I've contributed a fair bit of code to a few different open source projects before, some even being fairly sizeable new features. Though nothing remotely on the scale of complexity as the Linux kernel.

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