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Intelís first Optane SSD: 375GB that you can also use as RAM

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  • Intelís first Optane SSD: 375GB that you can also use as RAM

    Intel announced today the first Optane-branded product using its new 3D XPoint memory: the catchily named Intel Optane SSD DC P4800X. It's a 375GB SSD on a PCIe card. Initial limited availability starts today, for $1520, with broad availability in the second half of the year. In the second quarter, a 750GB PCIe model, and a 375GB model in the U.2 form factor will be released, and in the second half of the year, a 1.5TB PCIe card, and 750GB and 1.5TB U.2 stick, are planned.

    3D XPoint is a new kind of persistent solid state memory devised by Intel and Micron. Details on how the memory actually works remain scarce—it's generally believed to use some kind of change in resistance to record data—but its performance characteristics and technical capabilities make it appealing for a wide range of applications.

    When it was first announced in 2015, Intel claimed it would be 1,000 times faster than NAND flash, 10 times denser than DRAM, and 1,000 times better endurance than NAND, though without saying "faster at what" or "what kind of NAND" or anything like that. With the shipping product, these comparisons are now clearer, as one of Intel's slides make clear: 3D XPoint has about one thousandth the latency of NAND flash (or about ten times the latency of DRAM), and tens times the density of DRAM.

    The raw specs for the P4800X leaked in February. To summarize: it's a datacenter-oriented part, built for applications with high read/write loads, looking for low latency. The sequential transfer rates of 2400MB/s read, 2000MB/s write, are good, but some of the fastest NAND flash can pull slightly ahead. Where the P4800X excels is its ability to sustain high I/O loads, courtesy of those low latencies.

    Article continued: https://arstechnica.com/information-...so-use-as-ram/
    Sounds encouraging. Looking forward to this trickling down to consumers
    Last edited by cold fusion; 19-03-17, 22:13.

  • #2
    That's way too slow if they want to use it to replace RAM.

    My current NVMe drive is just as fast. So much for their 1000x faster than NAND story...
    Last edited by TheMadDutchDude; 20-03-17, 02:55.
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    • #3
      I guess they could make them a bit like virtual memory used to work, so once all of your normal system RAM is used, but ovbiously much faster.

      I wonder if eventually storage and RAM will just merge, if SSD's get fast enough.
      GIVE PEAS A CHANCE

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      • #4
        There's a better, more in-depth review and explanation from Gamer's Nexus. Interesting about the response time and bandwidth available <QD32 where most SSDs are tested to show off their max r/w speeds. For a launch product and largely unoptimised, I think in time it'll see some vast improvement.

        Article: http://www.gamersnexus.net/news-pc/2...-dc-p4800x-ssd

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TheMadDutchDude View Post
          That's way too slow if they want to use it to replace RAM.

          My current NVMe drive is just as fast. So much for their 1000x faster than NAND story...
          I'm not sure that the point of the article was the speed though.. This was the bit that caught my eye as one of the points of the article:

          Unlike flash, which physically wears out due to the stress placed by erases, 3D XPoint writes are non-destructive.
          Also, there are some instances where ram speed isn't critical, but quantity is. That's the sort of place that these drives could shine.

          However, it seems to me more like a proof of concept with many refinements and tweaks to come in future generations.



          Originally posted by coiler
          Stomach was rumbling like a fatman landing on Sanctuary

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          • #6
            Ouch - the software to allow you to run this as system ram is an extra $400...



            Originally posted by coiler
            Stomach was rumbling like a fatman landing on Sanctuary

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TheMadDutchDude View Post
              That's way too slow if they want to use it to replace RAM.

              My current NVMe drive is just as fast. So much for their 1000x faster than NAND story...
              This is just a first generation dude. No point comparing it to current top end NAND benchmarks and scoffing because it's pretty clear that 3D XPoint is already running circles around NAND in terms of density and performance in real world terms (eg not when you're having to pre-fill a NAND SSD buffers to fudge IOPS benchmarks). So it wont be long before 3D XPoint overtakes the high-end NAND devices as well.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Aaron View Post
                Ouch - the software to allow you to run this as system ram is an extra $400...
                5 lines of code in Linux:
                Code:
                sudo mkswap /dev/sdb1
                sudo swapon /dev/sdb1
                sudo sysctl vm.swappiness=90
                echo '/dev/sdb1 none swap defaults 0 0' | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab
                echo 'vm.swappiness = 90' | sudo tee -a /etc/sysctl.conf
                (you can half that code if you prefer to reboot to apply system settings like a Windoze user)
                Last edited by cold fusion; 20-03-17, 11:53.

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                • #9
                  i think this is the future too.

                  maybe not overnight, but the single pool of memory that doubles as ram and storage has long been the dream for all pc makers

                  going to be funny as i see a chance for someone to steal a march on microsoft during the transition.
                  "Those able to see beyond the shadows and lies of their culture will never be understood, let alone believed, by the masses."
                  Plato

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by luke22 View Post
                    i think this is the future too.

                    maybe not overnight, but the single pool of memory that doubles as ram and storage has long been the dream for all pc makers
                    Agreed but it's not without it's issues. A buffer overrun error (which are common as muck on C / C++ software) could then be exploited to access anything sensitive on the file system as well as in memory. Hopefully by then enough people will have migrated to memory safe languages to mitigate some of these issues.

                    Originally posted by luke22 View Post
                    going to be funny as i see a chance for someone to steal a march on microsoft during the transition.
                    I think the rise of popularity of the web application has done more for that than any hardware innovation. These days a web browser is a micro-OS inside a VM.

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                    • #11
                      is this why ms have changed the apps on their new store?

                      have they stole the march on everyone?
                      "Those able to see beyond the shadows and lies of their culture will never be understood, let alone believed, by the masses."
                      Plato

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