Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

CIT power supplys ... more information ect

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BigIan88
    replied
    Originally posted by TheMadDutchDude View Post
    Face... meet palm.

    That's atrocious.

    Reading the above, I felt the same way!

    Leave a comment:


  • Moonchester
    replied
    Something with lots of disk drives and lots of lights..

    Leave a comment:


  • PhillipM
    replied
    Originally posted by Mokey View Post
    I'm trying to think what you could possibly be powering that would need 750w but only 1 6 pin.
    Probably to stop you getting anywhere close to 750w

    Leave a comment:


  • Mokey
    replied
    Originally posted by TheMadDutchDude View Post
    Face... meet palm.

    That's atrocious.
    I'm trying to think what you could possibly be powering that would need 750w but only 1 6 pin.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheMadDutchDude
    replied
    Face... meet palm.

    That's atrocious.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mokey
    replied
    Originally posted by TheMadDutchDude View Post
    Your 650 watt unit has a single 6 pin PCIE connector and two SATA connectors? Doesn't that tell you it's ****? I've got a 35 XFX 450 watt unit with more than that. Also, I guarantee you this unit would put out 450 watts and yours would pop trying to do that.
    The 750w only has the 1 6 pin too.

    Leave a comment:


  • mac124
    replied
    Originally posted by Spaceboy View Post
    I agree with others here though... for budget "office" type builds, they should be fine, but I would never run one in a rig with a dedicated GPU requiring PCIe power.
    Pretty much how i feel about CIT and other "buget" psu's that are, at best, quoting peak power output.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhillipM
    replied
    I'd rate FSP as some of the best you can buy regardless, all my units have been high quality internals and great voltage control, even their beige box units. And they make the internals for many of the big brand names too.

    My generic FSP 600w unit here has more power available on the 12v rails than that 850w CIT does, and it's continuous rated too, not peak.

    Leave a comment:


  • Broadsword1976
    replied
    I've got two CiT PSUs here at the moment... a brand new 480 and an older one - one of the Gold coloured 650Watts (hopefully not "of Death" ) - both seem fairly solid - I'll happily build a low end gaming machine with both of them but nothing expensive - I agree entirely with Chaz, the PSU is the heart of the machine and simply not worth skimping on if you want a safe and stable set-up...I'd say that a power unit should take up about a sixth of the total budget of the whole tower w/o OS.

    In fairness even the bestest and most costly of PSUs can fail hard..It's just that it becomes less likely the more you spend - however I'm more than happy to use cheap units in cheap PCs and CiT are one of the best I've come across, I'd rate them on a par with FSP and well above the likes of Ace/Pulse and EZ Cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chaz
    replied
    Originally posted by andyn View Post
    Actually CIT are pretty good value tbh. I go for seasonic myelf so obviously I'm in agreement with the 'spend more on your PSU' argument above, but it depends what you are building. If you're building 50 cheap machines to run windows in an office environment or something, you're not going to fill them with seasonics or corsair RM units - so where you are looking at budget PSU it's good to know which OEMs produce reliable budget units.
    Oh of course I agree on the low end completely but the suggestion that a 750W PSU for 30 is anything other than a system failure waiting to happen (assuming you are using hardware that requires that wattage) is what I objected to more so.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spaceboy
    replied
    Good to have that extra info for sure, lots of other makers should readily provide that kind of info!

    I agree with others here though... for budget "office" type builds, they should be fine, but I would never run one in a rig with a dedicated GPU requiring PCIe power.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheMadDutchDude
    replied
    Your 650 watt unit has a single 6 pin PCIE connector and two SATA connectors? Doesn't that tell you it's ****? I've got a 35 XFX 450 watt unit with more than that. Also, I guarantee you this unit would put out 450 watts and yours would pop trying to do that.
    Last edited by TheMadDutchDude; 07-10-14, 16:51.

    Leave a comment:


  • PhillipM
    replied
    Didn't CiT used to be the same guys as the gold-psu-of-death camp?

    Leave a comment:


  • andyn
    replied
    Actually CIT are pretty good value tbh. I go for seasonic myelf so obviously I'm in agreement with the 'spend more on your PSU' argument above, but it depends what you are building. If you're building 50 cheap machines to run windows in an office environment or something, you're not going to fill them with seasonics or corsair RM units - so where you are looking at budget PSU it's good to know which OEMs produce reliable budget units.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chaz
    replied
    Congratulations on your new job at CiT (kidding)

    There is a reason that good power supplies cost good money, to me a power supply is a fit and forget item and I couldn't forget about attaching hundreds of quids worth of hardware to a bargain basement PSU. I was perfectly happy to shell out 130 for my seasonic PSU because its fully modular, had near the best performance in its class at the time and comes with a 5 year warranty. Since may 2012 not a single problem, I rebuilt it into a new case a few months ago and there was no dust in there because the fan hardly ever spins and when it comes out of warranty I shall simply replace it with its equivalent and enjoy another 5 years of issue free operation.

    To me a power supply is just not an item where I'm thinking about making a cost saving, it is the most important part of the computer and a cheap one can kill an entire system so why risk it to save some pennies?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X