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  • PSU Dilema..

    Hello Chaps,

    Long story short... My Microserver NAS died and as such the Big River are refunding me as they don't have that model in stock any more, so rather than mess about with a new Microserver I decided to go back to a custom NAS as I'd like a little more horsepower.

    I am left with a mind bending choice of PSU's (there's just way too many), but I know I want modular and I can't imagine I'd need anything more than ~500W for the system I'm looking to build, Ivy Bridge based (likely a G2020/P8H77-I combo), and will have my 5x3TB WD Reds and 1x128GB M4 in the drive bays.

    The PSU's I've been looking at are:

    bequiet! BN197 Straight Power E9 CM 480W (92.8% Gold)
    Seasonic M12II-520 - 520W (87% Bronze)
    Corsair CX500M - 500W (85% Bronze)

    Couple of questions...

    Am I in the right ball park for power or am I going overkill? (based on the Microserver only having a 150W PSU and coping absolutely fine with all my drives) I'd far rather spend money on a bullet proof PSU than scrimp and regret it later.

    Are my choices good? They all seem to have good reviews, or is there something better out there that I've missed?

    Thanks for any input

    R.
    PC: 4790K|H110i|Z97 Sabertooth Mk1|SLI GTX 980 SC|16 GB Beast 2400 MHz|2x850 Pro RAID0|W7|HX1000i|NZXT H440 SE|Dell U3415W|Genelec 8040a|Dacmagic Plus
    Mac Pro: Dual 6 Core X5690 Xeons|64 GB ECC|7970 Windforce 3|512 GB NVMe PCIe|2xWD Black 4 TB Raid 0|OS X 10.11.3|2x27" Apple Cinema Displays|KRK V4 Series 2

  • #2
    I have a CX430 in my NAS/server/thing, which uses an i3-2120, 8GB 1600MHz RAM and 5 HDDs, and it's never skipped a beat, so I'd imagine you're probably just erring on the side of overkill, but not massively

    All three PSUs are excellent, so I'd suggest weighing up cost vs. warranty and going for the best deal out of that
    Corsair 600T | Asus Sabertooth Z77 ATX | Intel i5-3570k | Corsair H100i | Corsair Vengeance LP Black 16GB | EVGA GTX670 2GB | Mushkin Chronos 240GB

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    • #3
      Re: PSU Dilema..

      I would have thought it would be overkill, but specs to be sure? Using the low power i3, I can't see you needing more than 300w.
      PC: Intel Core i5 3570k @ 3.4Ghz, Gigabyte GA-Z77N-WIFI, 2 x 4 GB Corsair XMS3 1333MHz, XFX 7870 LE.
      Laptop: Lenovo ThinkPad X220 - IntelCore i5 2520M @ 2.5Ghz, 4GB RAM

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      • #4
        I think the wattage is overkill but getting a lower wattage modular quality unit could prove troublesome
        --
        Fractal R4 (shhh!) 3570k, z77x-d3h, 16gb, R9-270X, 240gb SSD, 2tb mirror w/ 60gb cache drive

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        • #5
          Thank you for your input chaps, you pretty much summed up what I was thinking I certainly don't mind spending the extra for a solid efficient supply, but you are right Sb, finding a low wattage modular supply isn't really an option I think I may take a punt on the Be Quiet unless anyone has another suggestion?
          PC: 4790K|H110i|Z97 Sabertooth Mk1|SLI GTX 980 SC|16 GB Beast 2400 MHz|2x850 Pro RAID0|W7|HX1000i|NZXT H440 SE|Dell U3415W|Genelec 8040a|Dacmagic Plus
          Mac Pro: Dual 6 Core X5690 Xeons|64 GB ECC|7970 Windforce 3|512 GB NVMe PCIe|2xWD Black 4 TB Raid 0|OS X 10.11.3|2x27" Apple Cinema Displays|KRK V4 Series 2

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          • #6
            All those are decent really, and would do the job nicely. I would probably go for the Seasonic but that's just due to good experiences with them in the past, the BeQuiet also looks excellent.

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            • #7
              beQuiet are great PSUs, they beep when you first turn the system on, which I found a little odd, but obviously for an always-on system that's not really important
              Corsair 600T | Asus Sabertooth Z77 ATX | Intel i5-3570k | Corsair H100i | Corsair Vengeance LP Black 16GB | EVGA GTX670 2GB | Mushkin Chronos 240GB

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              • #8
                No one has mentioned efficiency. For always on, even something low powered like this eats electricity. So another way to choose between them is to look for the most efficient.

                That may also be another reason for 'overpowering': a 500 watt PSU running at 50 per cent load might be cheaper to run than a 300 watt running at 80 per cent load.

                Of course, finding efficiency data may be another challenge.
                Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus Z-170-K + Intel i5-6500 + 512GB Samsung M.2 PCI-e SSD + 16GB DDR4 2400MHz Memory
                Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus M5A88-M EVO + AMD Phenom II X6 + 8GB Corsair XMS3 1600 + Radeon HD 6450
                Win 10 Home 32-bit + Asus M2N-SLI DeLuxe + AMD Athlon 64 X2, Dual Core 5400 + 4.0 GB Memory + NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GT

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by michaelkenward View Post
                  Of course, finding efficiency data may be another challenge.
                  The efficiency figures are quoted in the OP

                  bequiet! BN197 Straight Power E9 CM 480W (92.8% Gold)
                  Seasonic M12II-520 - 520W (87% Bronze)
                  Corsair CX500M - 500W (85% Bronze)
                  (bolded)

                  Although the actual percentages just come from the manufacturers, the bronze/silver/gold badge things should be the result of an independent review verifying those claims by whoever hands those badges out. My understanding is that those percentages should be the minimum efficiency rating of the PSU when running at 20%, 50% and 100% of rated load - at any rate that's what the '80 plus' moniker refers to (80% eff at those percentages).

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by michaelkenward View Post
                    No one has mentioned efficiency. For always on, even something low powered like this eats electricity. So another way to choose between them is to look for the most efficient.

                    That may also be another reason for 'overpowering': a 500 watt PSU running at 50 per cent load might be cheaper to run than a 300 watt running at 80 per cent load.

                    Of course, finding efficiency data may be another challenge.
                    That's what I was thinking as well - a higher rated PSU running at a reasonable load (50%) will probably have a better efficiency than a smaller PSU running at 80% load or so. Personally I would not look to downgrade the power rating, but would probably pick the Seasonic from those choices.
                    720BE; GA MA790FXT-UD5P; 8Gb Mushkin silver; Sapphire 6950 (unlocked to 6970); TX850; 120Gb Mushkin Chronos; 8Tb HDD; 24" Ilyama Prolite; SteelSeries Ikari Laser; Saitek Eclipse II; FD Define XL

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by andyn View Post
                      The efficiency figures are quoted in the OP



                      (bolded)

                      Although the actual percentages just come from the manufacturers, the bronze/silver/gold badge things should be the result of an independent review verifying those claims by whoever hands those badges out. My understanding is that those percentages should be the minimum efficiency rating of the PSU when running at 20%, 50% and 100% of rated load - at any rate that's what the '80 plus' moniker refers to (80% eff at those percentages).
                      I was under the impression those were the % efficiency figures when at 80% load, hence the 80(bronze silver or gold). 400W would be plenty for that system.
                      Originally posted by andyn
                      Trick in most cases seems to be to get in early, and get out early. Pump and dump.
                      PC: - i5-3570k, Mushkin 64gb SSD, 8GB Vengeance, MSI Twin Frozr III 7850.
                      Laptop: - Asus N55SF, Core i7-2670QM, GT555M (2GB).

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                      • #12
                        Nope, pretty certain that it means 80% or more efficiency at a variety of loads.

                        Edit yup, here's a page with the numbers overview:

                        http://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80P...Supplies.aspx#

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                        • #13
                          I would take the Seasonic out of those three followed by the Be-Quiet. I would never buy a Corsair CX series. They are built down to a price and are quite poor. In terms of quality i would only rate them just above the likes of Winpower.
                          i5-4670k@4.5Ghz, Asus Maximus VI Hero, 16GB Samsung Green 2133Mhz@9-10-10-21/1N, Sandisk Extreme 240GB SSD, Crucial M500 240GB SSD, 1TB Hitachi 7K1000C, Seasonic G series 750w, EVGA GTX780 FTW ACX Watercooling / Pump 2x AquaXtreme 50z / CPU EK Supreme HF / GPU XSPC Rasa VGA / 25cm XSPC Passive res / Rads, Thermochill PA120.3 + CG360

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                          • #14
                            I purchased a few bequiet ones over the last year and no complaints. Fairly quite and seem efficient enough.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by andyn View Post
                              The efficiency figures are quoted in the OP
                              Yes, but until I brought it up one mentioned efficiency as a factor in choosing what to buy.

                              Had they done so, the choice would have been obvious.

                              Are those quoted efficiency numbers valid for all loads?

                              Maybe your "understanding" is correct. But I would look for confirmation. That is the evidence that might take some finding.

                              As you can see, there isn't universal agreement, or understanding, of what efficiency numbers mean.

                              Without evidence to the contrary, bequiet looks like the winner.

                              Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus Z-170-K + Intel i5-6500 + 512GB Samsung M.2 PCI-e SSD + 16GB DDR4 2400MHz Memory
                              Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus M5A88-M EVO + AMD Phenom II X6 + 8GB Corsair XMS3 1600 + Radeon HD 6450
                              Win 10 Home 32-bit + Asus M2N-SLI DeLuxe + AMD Athlon 64 X2, Dual Core 5400 + 4.0 GB Memory + NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GT

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