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Just set up a RAID configuration

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  • Just set up a RAID configuration

    Don't know if it's because I thought it'd be faster, because I was bored, or just because it seemed cool, but I finally got around to setting up SATA RAID in my system 8)

    I had a Hitachi 160GB SATA drive, but noticed I'd started to use up quite a lot of the space on it, probably from the huge pictures I take on my digital camera. So I bought an extra matching drive and put it in last night all RAID 0'd up with the current drive.

    Got to installing Windows XP and I realised oh, I don't have the RAID drivers on floppy disk, because clever old XP ONLY takes floppy disks for RAID drivers. Luckily my motherboard CD is bootable and has an option to create RAID drivers on it, and double luckily I have a floppy drive in my PC, for instances just such as this.

    Finally got Windows on, and everything's reasonably back to normal, and it seems ok. To be honest I don't notice much speed increase, but it still looks cool

    I have my faithful old Seagate Baracudda 60GB IDE drive in there for backup purposes as well, as I know what happens if one drive in a RAID 0 array goes kaput
    Gaming Rig: C2D E8400 @ 3.85GHz : Biostar TPower I45 : 4GB of something, I forget what : 4870 512MB DDR5 : X-Fi
    Media Rig: C2D E2160@ 1.86GHz : 2GB PC5300 : Palit 8800GTS 320MB : SB Audigy 2



  • #2
    [Removed at the request of the author]

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    • #3
      If you strip your RAID it puts 50% of everything on one drive, and 50% on the other, so if it's reading a 1Mb file, it gets it from both drives at the same time, 500Kb on each.

      Theoretically that would make it twice as fast, in reality it doesn't

      The alternative is mirrored RAID. That uses two drives but makes both of them identical, so if one drive breaks, the other has a mirror image of all your data.

      Strip RAID - RAID 0 - Best performance
      Mirror RAID - RAID 1 - Best for backup
      Gaming Rig: C2D E8400 @ 3.85GHz : Biostar TPower I45 : 4GB of something, I forget what : 4870 512MB DDR5 : X-Fi
      Media Rig: C2D E2160@ 1.86GHz : 2GB PC5300 : Palit 8800GTS 320MB : SB Audigy 2


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      • #4
        raid 5 with 4 drives does a bit of both, i think?
        Laptop: i7-3610QM~16GB~GT635M
        Gamer: i7 3820 @ 4.4Ghz~MSI X79A-GD65~16GB Redline 2133~HIS R290(X)~TT A90~CM SILENT PRO 1000w~U2713HM.
        Canon 5D Mk3 16-35 F4L / 24-105L / 180mmL / 70-200 2.8L IS II / Sigma 50mm f1.4DG / Sigma 150-600 Sport / 2x 430EXii (Me on 500px)

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        • #5
          Re:

          [quote:5df81c34f6=\"mac124\"]raid 5 with 4 drives does a bit of both, i think?[/quote:5df81c34f6]

          Aye I think so
          Gaming Rig: C2D E8400 @ 3.85GHz : Biostar TPower I45 : 4GB of something, I forget what : 4870 512MB DDR5 : X-Fi
          Media Rig: C2D E2160@ 1.86GHz : 2GB PC5300 : Palit 8800GTS 320MB : SB Audigy 2


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          • #6
            RAID is more hassle than it's worth, but there are some very nice NAS options around these days

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            • #7
              Raid 0 is called striped.

              The advantage of the more complex arrays (nothing to do with what i said above) means you can lose 1 disk and not lose your data, i think its referred to as hotswapping. If one goes down you take it out and replace it with another, and is job done, nothing lost, everything works...

              You won't generally see the high raid setups on mobo's, you have to spend a fair bit on a decent sata card, its not something the average joe needs though.

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              • #8
                Level 0 -- Striped Disk Array without Fault Tolerance: Provides data striping (spreading out blocks of each file across multiple disk drives) but no redundancy. This improves performance but does not deliver fault tolerance. If one drive fails then all data in the array is lost.

                Level 1 -- Mirroring and Duplexing: Provides disk mirroring. Level 1 provides twice the read transaction rate of single disks and the same write transaction rate as single disks.

                Level 2 -- Error-Correcting Coding: Not a typical implementation and rarely used, Level 2 stripes data at the bit level rather than the block level.

                Level 3 -- Bit-Interleaved Parity: Provides byte-level striping with a dedicated parity disk. Level 3, which cannot service simultaneous multiple requests, also is rarely used.

                Level 4 -- Dedicated Parity Drive: A commonly used implementation of RAID, Level 4 provides block-level striping (like Level 0) with a parity disk. If a data disk fails, the parity data is used to create a replacement disk. A disadvantage to Level 4 is that the parity disk can create write bottlenecks.

                Level 5 -- Block Interleaved Distributed Parity: Provides data striping at the byte level and also stripe error correction information. This results in excellent performance and good fault tolerance. Level 5 is one of the most popular implementations of RAID.

                Level 6 -- Independent Data Disks with Double Parity: Provides block-level striping with parity data distributed across all disks.
                Level 0+1 A Mirror of Stripes: Not one of the original RAID levels, two RAID 0 stripes are created, and a RAID 1 mirror is created over them. Used for both replicating and sharing data among disks.

                Level 10 A Stripe of Mirrors: Not one of the original RAID levels, multiple RAID 1 mirrors are created, and a RAID 0 stripe is created over these.


                I use Raid 0 as its probably the safiest bet for me 8)

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                • #9
                  Parity, thats it... ..... been so long since i touched raid.

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