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  • Homeplugs question

    I have a couple of TP Link 1000 plugs but having moved house, need to rejig the network to get coverage everywhere.

    Question is, would 2000mb plugs give better speeds than 1000's over the same wire, or is it the case that if the 1000's are not throttling then there is no need to go for a higher speed?

    Im assuming the whole network won't limit itself to the speed of the slowest plug but shout if that's wrong!
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  • #2
    YEs it will run at th slowest.
    No it won't help much if the cable is the limiting factor.
    I've not failed. I've just found 10.000 ways that don't work!
    Dave Burnett

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    • #3
      So I'll buy extra 1000's then. Thanks.
      i7 3770K @ 3.5Ghz (to overclock) Noctua NH-D14 Cooler Gigabyte Z77X-D3H 16GB Corsair Vengeance LP @ 1600Mhz 2 x KFA2 670 OC 4GB (SLI) 2 x 256GB & 1 x 64GB Crucial M4 SSD Corsair TX 850w Antec P182 W7 Professional 64 27" Yamakasi Catleap 2560 x 1440 Asus Xonar DX Alesis M1 Active 520

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      • #4
        How fast do you need it lol?
        GIVE PEAS A CHANCE

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        • #5
          88mph at least.

          The 1000's aren't running at full speed so was more wondering whether a faster underlying technology would improve speed. Guess not.

          Another factor is that I was looking to have two plugs about 50m away from each other, again wondering if the faster plugs would improve speeds over that distance. Was getting about 120mb when I tested.
          i7 3770K @ 3.5Ghz (to overclock) Noctua NH-D14 Cooler Gigabyte Z77X-D3H 16GB Corsair Vengeance LP @ 1600Mhz 2 x KFA2 670 OC 4GB (SLI) 2 x 256GB & 1 x 64GB Crucial M4 SSD Corsair TX 850w Antec P182 W7 Professional 64 27" Yamakasi Catleap 2560 x 1440 Asus Xonar DX Alesis M1 Active 520

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          • #6
            120Mbps or 120MB/s

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            • #7
              Remember, if you do buy new plugs, you have to get them to talk to the old ones. You need just one plug connected to the router.

              Out of the box a pair of plugs will talk to one another, but not the older plugs. Introduce the two new plugs to the existing network one at a time.

              Unfortunately, most makers don't sell single plugs. But you should be able to mix different makes of plug, they are supposed to work to the AV standard, but it is usually easier to stick to the same brand.

              If you fancy extending your wifi at the same time, you might want to look into buying a pack with a wifi access point.

              I assume that the TPLink plugs also do Gb Ethernet. They'd have to if they want to 1000 Mbps Powerline.

              It may seem odd, but even Netgear users prefer the Zyxel powerline software. It has better control over things like sleep mode, which can be a pain. Plugs go to sleep and won't wake up.
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              • #8
                Well there is a thing about how they negotiate speed, going for a 2000 makes sense if it loses half its signal and is only a '1000' at a distance. Obviously It will only get a higher link speed if all are the same speed.

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                • #9
                  Well there is a thing about how they negotiate speed, going for a 2000 makes sense if it loses half its signal and is only a '1000' at a distance. Obviously It will only get a higher link speed if all are the same speed.

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                  • #10
                    Slightly older thread but there's a little bit of misinformation here. Homeplugs do work just fine when mixing brands. You obviously can't use the management software from one brand to adjust settings on another but you'll still get a connection and throughput. I've been doing this for years with my main TP Link gigabit plugs and an older Devolo AV500 set. They're still working, so no point replacing them yet. The speed between the TP Link plugs are much greater than TP Link to Devolo; however, I'm still getting 450Mbps between the brands and over 700 between the 2x TP Links.

                    Also, the network doesn't default to the lowest speed. It'll run each link independently at the highest link speed it is possible to maintain it. As the powerlines in your home are used and noise is introduced into the circuit, they adjust the SNR to maintain a stable connection, albeit at a lower speed.

                    If you're troubleshooting slow transfer rates across a powerline network, try a socket on the other side of the room. Unless you know how your home is wired up, you've no way of knowing how much extra cable and how many potential poor connections that you're asking that network traffic to pass through. If you can shorten that pipeline by even a few metres, you'll see a marked improvement and it may be more desirable to use that socket and run some ethernet from one side of the room to the other. In one of my bedrooms, one socket is considerably slower than the other and also triples the ping times. In this case, I ran ethernet around the skirting.
                    Last edited by Bing; 3 weeks ago.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bing View Post
                      Slightly older thread but there's a little bit of misinformation here. Homeplugs do work just fine when mixing brands.
                      Don't know which bit you are replying too there. Like I said a few messages ago:

                      But you should be able to mix different makes of plug, they are supposed to work to the AV standard, but it is usually easier to stick to the same brand.
                      I have mixed various makes, but I homed in on Netgear because it is, as you suggest, easier to manage the same brand. But as I said before there are some settings where it helps to use rival software. Zyxel, for example, has software that you can use to change the "energy saving" settings a on Netgear plugs, that Netgear's utility cannot handle.

                      The speed thing will depend on how you have your network configured. You can run independent networks at different speeds on the same mains circuit. But they won't talk to each other.

                      The people who tell you that plugs will default to the slower speeds are, er, the people who make them. Then again, they don't get everything right (see below).

                      An important point to consider for some people is the Ethernet speed at the socket. Older plugs have 100 Mbps LAN sockets while newer one do 1000 Mbps. Of course, you won't get these speeds, but if you have a PC with 1000 Mbps Ethernet, 100 Mbps plugs won't be up to scratch.

                      There is some useful stuff in the Netgear FAQ:

                      Product FAQ: Powerline Adapters | Answer | NETGEAR Support

                      It is not, though, totally reliable. For example, it is wrong where it says:

                      NETGEAR does not recommend using power strips, surge protectors, UPS and extension cords with Powerline products.
                      It works fine with power strips and extension cords. I haven't tried it with surge protectors and UPS, but I can see that they could cause problems.
                      Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus Z-170-K + Intel i5-6500 + 512GB Samsung M.2 PCI-e SSD + 16GB DDR4 2400MHz Memory
                      Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus M5A88-M EVO + AMD Phenom II X6 + 8GB Corsair XMS3 1600 + Radeon HD 6450
                      Win 10 Home 32-bit + Asus M2N-SLI DeLuxe + AMD Athlon 64 X2, Dual Core 5400 + 4.0 GB Memory + NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GT

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bing View Post
                        Slightly older thread but there's a little bit of misinformation here. Homeplugs do work just fine when mixing brands.
                        Don't know which bit you are replying too there. Like I said a few messages ago:

                        But you should be able to mix different makes of plug, they are supposed to work to the AV standard, but it is usually easier to stick to the same brand.
                        I have mixed various makes, but I homed in on Netgear because it is, as you suggest, easier to manage the same brand. But as I said before there are some settings where it helps to use rival software. Zyxel, for example, has software that you can use to change the "energy saving" settings a on Netgear plugs, that Netgear's utility cannot handle.

                        The speed thing will depend on how you have your network configured. You can run independent networks at different speeds on the same mains circuit. But they won't talk to each other.

                        The people who tell you that plugs will default to the slower speeds are, er, the people who make them. Then again, they don't get everything right (see below).

                        An important point to consider for some people is the Ethernet speed at the socket. Older plugs have 100 Mbps LAN sockets while newer one do 1000 Mbps. Of course, you won't get these speeds, but if you have a PC with 1000 Mbps Ethernet, 100 Mbps plugs won't be up to scratch.

                        There is some useful stuff in the Netgear FAQ:

                        Product FAQ: Powerline Adapters | Answer | NETGEAR Support

                        It is not, though, totally reliable. For example, it is wrong where it says:

                        NETGEAR does not recommend using power strips, surge protectors, UPS and extension cords with Powerline products.
                        It works fine with power strips and extension cords. I haven't tried it with surge protectors and UPS, but I can see that they could cause problems.
                        Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus Z-170-K + Intel i5-6500 + 512GB Samsung M.2 PCI-e SSD + 16GB DDR4 2400MHz Memory
                        Win 10 Pro 64-bit + Asus M5A88-M EVO + AMD Phenom II X6 + 8GB Corsair XMS3 1600 + Radeon HD 6450
                        Win 10 Home 32-bit + Asus M2N-SLI DeLuxe + AMD Athlon 64 X2, Dual Core 5400 + 4.0 GB Memory + NVIDIA GeForce 8600 GT

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