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  • Wrong part inside.

    Hi there,

    I ordered a Gladiator i5-3570k which arrived today. I'm very happy about it and it's running really smooth. Only problem is that it states, that it comes with a 500GB Sata III 6GB, I have checked and it is only SATA II 3GB.

    How do I go about getting this resolved thanks.

    Kaz

    Quickcode: 52485

  • #2
    Hi there,

    I don't work for Aria but I believe one of the first things a staff member would ask for is the original order number (Starts with EC) and they will be happy to look into it further. Alternatively, you could try calling up their customer service line and providing the details to an agent who will also investigate the matter.

    On a side note, for mechanical hard drives - they don't saturate the sata port (unlike SSD's) so the difference in speed between a sata II and sata III mechical drive is next to nothing.
    i7 3770k - MSI Z77 Mpower - 16GB Avexir Mpower 2400Mhz - 500GB Samsung 840 EVO - EVGA GTX 980 SC - 1200W CM Gold - Custom Watercooling Loop - Corsair Air 540 - Steelseries 6Gv2 - Logitech MX 518 - Asus PB287Q - Creative T20




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    • #3
      Can I just ask - how did you check? If it was just through software or the bios, it may just be that it's plugged in to one of the SATA2 ports, rather than a SATA3 port.. In reality it won't make any difference to the speed though



      Originally posted by coiler
      Stomach was rumbling like a fatman landing on Sanctuary

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      • #4
        I dont work for Aria either, but the two guys above are correct.

        There will be no difference between SATA II & III in mechanical hard drives. Aria system builders will more than likely have used a SATA II port on the motherboard to leave you room for more SATA III stuff in the future.

        Either way, I wouldn't worry about it. Enjoy your new PC :-)

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        • #5
          can you check to see if the HDD you have installed is a seagate, model number: ST500DM002


          if it is, the drive has most likely just been plugged into a SATA II port as that drive is most definitely a SATA III.
          Overkill Media Rig
          Intel® Core™ i7 4790K @ Stock | ASUS ROG Maximus VI Impact | 8GB Corsair Vengeance LP Red 1866 C11 | 240GB Crucial M500 | 2x 4TB Seagate Barracuda Media Drives + 1x 2TB 2.5" Games/Scratch Drive | Gigabyte GTX 780 OC (Titan Cooler) | EVGA Hadron Air w/ PSU
          | 46" Samsung Full HD 3D TV

          Gaming Rig
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          • #6
            Re: Wrong part inside.

            Thnx for the info guys. I will check into it when I get back. (Away for the weekend) If there is no difference then I won't bother. But why would one say 3gb and one 6gb (sry bit of a newb )

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            • #7
              Well, technically, the interface is Sata III (6Gbps), however, conventional hard drives cannot exceed the maximum transfer rate of Sata II (3Gbps), so in terms of performance, it's irrelevant.
              It's really just a marketing trick.
              Originally posted by andyn
              Trick in most cases seems to be to get in early, and get out early. Pump and dump.
              PC: - i5-3570k, Mushkin 64gb SSD, 8GB Vengeance, MSI Twin Frozr III 7850.
              Laptop: - Asus N55SF, Core i7-2670QM, GT555M (2GB).

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Stewpotz View Post
                can you check to see if the HDD you have installed is a seagate, model number: ST500DM002


                if it is, the drive has most likely just been plugged into a SATA II port as that drive is most definitely a SATA III.
                Hey Stew, I checked the drive and got this info from the PC Software. Searched the model no. and found this was SATA II (correct me if i'm wrong). Although like you all said if it doesn't make a difference, then i'm not too fussed.
                Thanks for the help guys.

                Last edited by kazuya88; 14-01-13, 01:32.

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                • #9
                  what does it say if you go into BIOS and select HDD boot options (there will be 2, 1 will just show SSD the other will show both drives installed. this will give you the full drive name.)

                  but as previously stated, mechanical drives really dont see any difference between being plugged into SATA II & SATA III
                  Overkill Media Rig
                  Intel® Core™ i7 4790K @ Stock | ASUS ROG Maximus VI Impact | 8GB Corsair Vengeance LP Red 1866 C11 | 240GB Crucial M500 | 2x 4TB Seagate Barracuda Media Drives + 1x 2TB 2.5" Games/Scratch Drive | Gigabyte GTX 780 OC (Titan Cooler) | EVGA Hadron Air w/ PSU
                  | 46" Samsung Full HD 3D TV

                  Gaming Rig
                  Intel® Core™ i7 4790K @ 4.90GHz - Will Get 5GHz!! | ASUS ROG Maximus VII Gene | 16GB Corsair Vengeance Pro Red 1866 C10 | Corsair H100i | 2x OCZ 120GB SSD RAID 0 - Windows 8.1 | 80GB Intel SSD - Windows 10 Developer Preview | MSI Gaming GTX 770 2-Way SLi | Corsair AX 860i Platinum PSU | Corsair Obsidian 350D mATX Case | Dell Ultrasharp Monitor

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                  • #10
                    ^ He does work for Aria,.

                    I don't, however, but I'd just like to point out that all the product descriptions say SATA-III, so it might be worth someone taking a look and changing them as required, just so people don't get confused in the future
                    Corsair 600T | Asus Sabertooth Z77 ATX | Intel i5-3570k | Corsair H100i | Corsair Vengeance LP Black 16GB | EVGA GTX670 2GB | Mushkin Chronos 240GB

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Cosford View Post
                      Well, technically, the interface is Sata III (6Gbps), however, conventional hard drives cannot exceed the maximum transfer rate of Sata II (3Gbps), so in terms of performance, it's irrelevant.
                      It's really just a marketing trick.

                      i knew the difference was small, I thought around 1-2% like SATA I (1.5gb) vs SATA II (3gb), but wasn't aware of the max transfer rate is limited to SATA II
                      Originally posted by Aaron
                      I want those sweet cherries

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                      • #12
                        SATA II ports top-out at 300MB/s.

                        A high speed mechanical hdd (Eg: velociraptor) can push anything up to about 200MB/s on 10k+ rpm drives.
                        Majority of 7200rpm drives can push up to around 100-120MB/s on a very good day but 60-80MB/s is more usual imho.

                        SATAII is more than enough
                        --
                        Fractal R4 (shhh!) 3570k, z77x-d3h, 16gb, R9-270X, 240gb SSD, 2tb mirror w/ 60gb cache drive

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                        • #13
                          Re: Wrong part inside.

                          Originally posted by Stewpotz View Post
                          what does it say if you go into BIOS and select HDD boot options (there will be 2, 1 will just show SSD the other will show both drives installed. this will give you the full drive name.)

                          but as previously stated, mechanical drives really dont see any difference between being plugged into SATA II & SATA III
                          I checked it just now and it has the same readings. MD05000-BQDW-RO

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                          • #14
                            Transfer rates were not the only changes between SATA II & III, although that was the major reason for the upgrade. Personally, where possible i would always connect like for like when it comes to interfaces on devices/controllers, no point forcing something to run in it's compatibility mode when there is no need, we saw weird results from external SATA II drives when forced to run at SATA I speeds (Seagate Freeagent Pro + Gigabyte SATA I mobo, i personally RMA'd 2 of these with stuttering and disconnect issues until we found out why) as well as internal drives that misbehaved, thus why seagate has a jumper for downshifting/limiting to SATA I speeds/commands, and samsung used a software switch.

                            Full details on the specifications can be found at places like the SATA wiki ....

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA

                            which is where i copied this from ....

                            SATA revision 3.0 - 6 Gbit/s - 600 MB/s
                            Serial ATA International Organization presented the draft specification of SATA 6 Gbit/s physical layer in July 2008, and ratified its physical layer specification on August 18, 2008. The full 3.0 standard was released on May 27, 2009. It runs with a native transfer rate of 6.0 Gbit/s, and taking 8b/10b encoding into account, the maximum uncoded transfer rate is 4.8 Gbit/s (600 MB/s). The theoretical burst throughput of SATA 6.0 Gbit/s is double that of SATA revision 2.0. The 3.0 specification contains the following changes:
                            • 6 Gbit/s for scalable performance
                            • Continued compatibility with SAS, including SAS 6 Gbit/s. "A SAS domain may support attachment to and control of unmodified SATA devices connected directly into the SAS domain using the Serial ATA Tunneled Protocol (STP)" from the SATA_Revision_3_0_Gold specification.
                            • Isochronous Native Command Queuing (NCQ) streaming command to enable isochronous quality of service data transfers for streaming digital content applications.
                            • An NCQ Management feature that helps optimize performance by enabling host processing and management of outstanding NCQ commands.
                            • Improved power management capabilities.
                            • A small low insertion force (LIF) connector for more compact 1.8-inch storage devices.
                            • A connector designed to accommodate 7 mm optical disk drives for thinner and lighter notebooks.
                            • Alignment with the INCITS ATA8-ACS standard.
                            • In general, the enhancements are aimed at improving quality of service for video streaming and high-priority interrupts. In addition, the standard continues to support distances up to one meter. The newer speeds may require higher power consumption for supporting chips, although improved process technologies and power management techniques may mitigate this. The later specification can use existing SATA cables and connectors, although it was reported in 2008 that some OEMs were expected to upgrade host connectors for the higher speeds.
                            • The later standard is backwards compatible with SATA 3 Gbit/s.


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